Show Notes:

This week is about COBie again. According to the COBie guide there are 3 main players and 4 COBie deliverables. I'm going to talk about which player is responsible for each deliverable.

Quote of the week:
"It's the little details that are vital. Little things make big things happen. " John Wooden , UCLA

Using COBie does not add new requirements to your contracts. Instead, COBie changes the format of existing deliverables, paper documents and proprietary data formats, to an open international standard data format. COBie also does not specify exactly WHAT information needs to be delivered and WHO will provide it. COBie provides the open standard for exchanging information, it is still up to the project team and owner to define what that information will be for each project. Hopefully you already have that defined as a standard business practice. Now COBie can help you go digital.

So where do you start? How do you get all of that information into the COBie file? The COBie guide linked to in the last episodes show notes provides a good place to start to identify what information will be gathered or required. When we say that COBie delivers facility asset information, it is important to understand that the standard needs to arrange that information so it can be easily produced and consumed worldwide. The COBie guide as well as spreadsheets available for download provide a look at that arrangement of information. I will cover the data organization in more detail in a later episode or article, but as you can imagine when importing and exporting data to software applications you need to have some data key generated by the software to track changes that may occur. Take a look at the guide to see the kind of information needed for the different types of assets.

COBie has 4 deliverables:

  1. 35% Design Development
  2. 100% Construction Documents
  3. Beneficial Occupancy
  4. Fiscal Completion

COBie involves 3 responsible parties:

  1. The Owner
  2. The Architect/Designer
  3. The General Contractor or Main Contractor

The first responsible party is the Owner. When we start the project we are going to need to get the requirements of the owner. Identify the tools that are going to be used. When COBie data exchanges are planned we will need to know at the start if the owner is going to be using a specific software to manage the data. We also need to know if the owner has a specific classification system to be used with their software tool. The general default classification when the client does not have specific needs, is going to be Omniclass. So the first who does what, is the owner. The owner needs to provide information about the facility, software tools and classification system that needs to be used. If the owner does not have special requirements, and there are no specific national or regional property definitions to be used, it is a good idea for the design team to have a coordination (planning) meeting and collect all of the important information from the Owner.

The second responsible party is the Architect. Many parts of the project will be handled by different people, possibly using different software. This is where your BIM Project Plan (BIM execution plan) comes into play. We talked about this is Episode 002 and Episode 003. Planning, team work and collaboration allows everyone to know what is expected from their team. COBie has a 35% Design Development deliverable (schematic design) and a 100% Construction Document deliverable. It is the responsibility of the architect (or design/builder) to provide the information at these stages. They must collect the data from whoever worked on that part of the project. The BIM project plan comes in very handy for defining these responsibilities.

COBie Data Required Content
Contact data One row for the designer’s BIM manager shall be provided.
Facility data One facility per COBie file.
Floor data One row for each vertical level to include foundations, floors, roofs,   and site
Space data One row per functional space, per room. Mult. spaces in a room possible.
Zone data One row for each COBie.Space and COBie.Zone type.
Type data One row for each scheduled product type found on design drawings.
Component data One row for each individual scheduled product found on design drawings.
System data One row for each system to be defined in the next stage of design.
Document data One row for each associated deliverable document linked to relevant sheet.
  One row listing URL of target product COBie.Type selected.
Attribute data One row for each required COBie.Space Attribute.
  One row for each required COBie.Type Attribute.
  One row for each required COBie.Component Attribute.
 Table1: Data required for the Design Development and Construction Document deliverable

 

The third responsible party is the General Contractor. The responsibility of the general or main contractor is to provide updates to the construction documents model to reflect any changes, additions or deletions. The attributes of the equipment and products will also be updated in the COBie file to reflect what was actually installed for the project.

COBie Data Required Content
Contact data One row for the designer’s BIM manager shall be provided.
Facility data One facility per COBie file.
Floor data One row for each vertical level to include foundations, floors, roofs, and site.
Space data One space per functional use.
Zone data One row for each COBie.Space and COBie.Zone type.
Type data One row for each scheduled product type found on design drawings.
Component data One row for each individual scheduled product found on design drawings.
document data One row for each COBie.Component identifying the related COBie.System.
Spare data Row(s) for each spare, part, or lubricant for each COBie.Type
Resource data One row for each material, labor, training, or other required resource
Job data Row(s) for each COBie.Type identifying PM Schedules
  Row(s) for COBie.Types identifying Operations Schedules
  Row(s) for COBie.Components identifying Operations Schedules
Document data  
  Row(s) for each COBie.Type listing each approved submittal document.
  Row(s) for each COBie.Type listing all commissioning submittals.
  Row(s) for each COBie.Component listing all commissioning submittals.
  One row for a photograph of each COBie.Component equipment nameplate.
Attribute data One row for each required COBie.Space Attribute.
  One row for each required COBie.Type Attribute.
  One row for each COBie.Component equipment nameplate information
 Table2: Date required for the Beneficial Occupancy and Fiscal Completion deliverable

 

Now that there is a full set of digital information for the facility the Owner can import this data into the software they use to maintain the facility and keep on updating it to record maintenance and changes that take place during occupancy.

 

Resources:

The COBie guide:
http://www.nibs.org/?page=bsa_cobieguide
Example COBie Specification:
http://projects.buildingsmartalliance.org/files/?artifact_id=2612
A look at Omniclass:
http://www.omniclass.org/
The Whole Building Design Guide:
http://www.wbdg.org/resources/cobie.php

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Show notes:

This episode is about COBie, the Construction Operations Building Information Exchange. What this made up word means is that the Construction team is giving data to the Operations people via an Information Exchange, i.e. NOT paper. A global term for this, meaning in use worldwide, is Facility Management Handover Modelview Definition, but it is going to be easier for us to look at this if we think Construction team exchanging data with the Operations team.

Quote of the week:
"The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step." Lao Tzu

COBie is a step in our long journey of a thousand miles. There are many parts to the process and much information to exchange. COBie is one step, and concentrates on spaces, scheduled equipment, warranties and parts, and approved submittals. Other projects are looking at other parts of the building process and information. We can look at those in later episodes.

COBie (Construction Operations Building Information Exchange)

COBie is a fully extensible and customizable standard for information exchange, but before we revel in our destination I think we should

Read more: Episode 016 - COBie - The way to exchange information


Show notes:

For weeks we have been talking about how BIM is about collaboration and sharing information with the other team members. We talked about the contractual and planning aspects, but how can you actually share and work together? The answer is IFC, Industry Foundation Classes.

Quote of the week:
"It is always easy to find fault with a classification. There are a hundred ways of arranging any set of objects, and something mayalmost always be said against the best, and in favour of the worst of them. But the merits of a classification depend on the purposes to which it is instrumental". John Stuart Mill

IFC is a way to classify all of the things that go into a building project. Similar to our quote, the classification can be good or bad, but the fact that this classification system is being used to coordinate and share BIM data, successfully, is what makes it useful for us.

The BuildingSMART web page defines IFC as:

The Industry Foundation Classes IFC represent an open specification for Building Information Modeling BIM data that is exchanged and shared among the various participants in a building construction or facility management project. IFC's are the international openBIM standard.

In this episode I talk about What IFC is, How IFC is used and What are some of the benefits of IFC.

What is IFC?

Read more: Episode 015 - IFC - The way to share your BIM


Show notes:

This week I'll talk about the difficulties of incorporating BIM into Facility Management.  I also have a new domain name; www.CreateBuildingsBetter.com
In addition to www.BIMtv.net, that domain will host the audio show and show notes.
 
Quote of the week:
"The greater the obstacle, the more glory in overcoming it." -Molière
 

Integrating BIM into the complete lifecycle of a building

Integrating BIM into the complete lifecycle of a building seems like a pretty big obstacle. A Stanford University study reported that the cost to operate and maintain a building over the course of 30 years is nearly the same as the cost for design and construction.

Read more: Episode 014 - Incorporating BIM into Facility Management


Show notes:

This week I'll talk about a 2011 report called the ten truths about BIM.  The WSP group commissioned the study to find out about the perception of BIM around the world.  Now that we have hit 2014 I think we can look back and see that the report has been pretty much on target with the ten truths they came up with.
 
Quote of the week:
"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes."― Mark Twain
 

Perhaps not the best quote of the week, but my point is that BIM is taking some time to roll out to all parts of the constructions and operation industry.  Alot longer than a tweetable event that happens and gets sent around the world instantly.

 

The 10 truths about BIM

Read more: Episode 013 - The 10 truths about BIM